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  2. (Source: R2--D2, via wooden-folks)

     
  3. alcyere:

    Landscapes III by Lukas Furlan

    (via gravitationalbeauty)

     
  4. cjwho:

    Mont Saint-Michel by Nicolas Cazard

    Mont Saint-Michel (pronounced: [mɔ̃ sɛ̃ mi.ʃɛl]; English: Saint Michael’s Mount) is an island commune in Normandy, France. It is located approximately one kilometre (just over half a mile) off the country’s northwestern coast, at the mouth of the Couesnon River near Avranches. 247 acres (100 ha) in size, the island has a population of 44 (2009).
    The island has held strategic fortifications since ancient times, and since the eighth century AD has been the seat of the monastery from which it draws its name. The structural composition of the town exemplifies the feudal society that constructed it. On top God, the abbey and monastery, below this the Great halls, then stores and housing, and at the bottom, outside the walls, fishermen and farmers’ housing.

    CJWHO: facebook | twitter | pinterest | subscribe

    (via gravitationalbeauty)

     
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  7. nubbsgalore:

    photos of sakurajima, the most active volcano in japan, by (click pic) takehito miyatake (previously featured) and martin rietze. volcanic storms can rival the intensity of massive supercell thunderstorms, but the source of the charge responsible for this phenomenon remains hotly debated.

    in the kind of storm clouds that generate conventional lightning, ice particles and soft hail collide, building up positive and negative charges, respectively. they separate into layers, and the charge builds up until the electric field is high enough to trigger lightning.

    but the specific mechanism by which particles of differing charges are separated in the ash cloud is still unknown. lightning has been observed between the eruption plume and the volcano right at the start of an eruption, suggesting that there are processes that occur inside the volcano to lead to charge separation.  

    volcanic lightning could yield clues about the earth’s geological past, and could answer questions about the beginning of life on our planet. volcanic lightning could have been the essential spark that converted water, hydrogen, ammonia, and methane molecules present on a primeval earth into amino acids, the building blocks of life.

    (see also: previous volcanology posts)

    (via thebeaconofgondor)

     
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  13. adriennepitts:

    It’s going to be quite a while before I can share the DSLR photographs I took in Iceland with you, so for the meanwhile, here are some of my favourite Instagram shots taken during 5 days in this most magical of places. I cannot wait to return, and explore this treasure of a place even further… If you’d like to see more you can visit me @hellopoe on Instagram!

    (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

     
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